Convent of Jesus and Mary Language College
An Outstanding Catholic School

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English

 

 

Welcome to the English Department

 

The English department is a committed team of teachers who strive to inspire students with a high regard for literature. We consistency have high expectations of the girls and their work. The students find our curriculum and passion for literature enriching and our girls repeatedly compete robustly with all students nationally.

 

STAFF

Miss A. Abdi (English Teacher)

Ms. H. Ahmed (English Teacher)

Mr. T. Boon (English Teacher)

Ms M. Di Lullo (Curriculum Leader)

Dr. D. Espinosa (English Teacher with responsibility for literacy)

Miss F. Habtom (English Teacher)

Miss L. Hodgson (2nd in Department)

Mrs R. Kosmin (English Teacher with responsibility for whole school literacy)

Mrs E. Owen (English Teacher)
Mrs. D. Peppiatt (Deputy Headteacher)

Mr. D. O'Sullivan (English Teacher)

Ms. S. Ziff (Head of House, Inclusion and English Teacher)

 

 

KS3 Curriculum

Year 7 Curriculum

 

Year   7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

content /skills

 

 

FOCUS: CHARACTERISATION

‘Dickens’ villains’: exploring a range of Dickens’ most memorable villains and how their characters are constructed.

FOCUS: STRUCTURE SKILLS

‘Moments and Memories’: exploring a range of autobiographical and biographical style extracts and studying how the events are organised/structured/formed

FOCUS: COMPARISON

‘Family relations poetry’: exploring both contemporary and traditional poetry and focus on developing strong comparisons.

FOCUS: FUNCTIONAL WRITING

‘Crime Report Writing’: how to select, structure and organise information in a formal report style using fictional crimes as sources.

FOCUS: CONTEXT AND GENRE

‘Midsummer’s Night Dream’: exploring the character of Bottom in the genre of comedy.

FOCUS: FICTIVE WRITING

‘Popular Novels’: using a popular modern children’s novel to inspire creative writing in the voice of the characters/scenarios from the novel.

assessment

Writing level

To create a strong character using some of Dicken’s technique and his writing as inspiration   

 Literature/reading level

Analysing how an unseen extract is structured.

Literature/reading level

An analytical comparison of 2 poems.

Students will have access to un-annotated copies of the poems.

Writing level

Use an unseen extract of a fictional crime to create a formal report. 

Literature/reading level

To evaluate a ‘to what extent……’ question on Bottom’s character.

Writing level

Creative writing in the form of a diary response. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 8 Curriculum

 

Year   8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

content/skills

 

 

FOCUS: Narrative writing

 

Building on characterisation from year 7, students begin to explore the power of symbols and motifs to develop layered narrative writing.

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FOCUS: STRUCTURE SKILLS

‘War Poetry’: exploring a range of WW1+WW2 poetry and exploring how they are organised/structured/formed

FOCUS: COMPARISON

‘Victorian Literature: comparing Dickens’ ‘The Signal Man’ and Hardy’s ‘The Withered Arm’

FOCUS: FUNCTIONAL WRITING

‘Responding to articles: how to respond to opinions and organise a formal argument/persuasive piece.

FOCUS: CONTEXT AND GENRE

‘Romeo and Juliet’: exploring the character of Juliet in the genre of tragedy.

FOCUS: FICTIVE WRITING

‘Gothic Writing’: creative writing describing gothic settings and developing moments of tensions.

assessment

 

Writing level

GCSE style Q5 narrative question

Literature/reading level

Analysing how a unseen poem is structured to create meaning

Literature/reading level

An analytical comparison of the two short stories. (CLOSED BOOK)

Writing level

Respond with an argument to an unseen extract.

Literature/reading level

To evaluate a ‘to what extent……’ question on Juliet’s character.

Writing level

Creative writing in the form of a description. 

 

Key Stage 4 curriculum

 

We aim to provide an appropriate curriculum for students. Having studied: Conan Doyle’s ‘The Speckled Band’, how to explore and respond to controversial statements and how to compare poems (with a focus on Love Poetry), Students are tested in Year 9 to ensure that the are placed on one of two pathways which is best suited to them.

 

The majority of our students will sit two GCSES in Year 11: English Literature and English Language (following the AQA curriculum). For some of our students, they will sit the English Language GCSE only in Year 11 and will work towards an accredited Language certificate in year 10.

 

The English Language GCSE consists of 2 examination papers. For each paper, Section A focuses on reading and comprehension of unseen texts and Section B focuses on the ability to produce extended writing. For further details please see AQA’s specification.

 

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-language-8700/specification-at-a-glance

 

The English Literature GCSE consists of 2 examination papers. For paper 1 students are examined on Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’ and Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’. For Paper 2 students study Priestley’s ‘An Inspector Calls’ and a selection of poetry based on the theme of power and conflict. For further details please see AQA’s specification:

 

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-literature-8702/specification-at-a-glance

 

 

Key Stage 5 curriculum

 

Specification: AQA English Literature B. There are three elements to this course: the study and investigation two literary genres which are publicly examined (80%) and an coursework element (20%).

  1. Genre: Tragedy

Texts studied in class:

• Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’

• Hardy’s ‘Tess d’Urberville’

• Miller’s ‘Death of a Salesman’

Exam:

Section A: one passage based question on ‘Othello’ (25 marks)

Section B: one essay question on set ‘Othello’ (25 marks)

Section C: one essay question exploring an aspect of tragedy through the study of Miller’s and Hardy’s texts (25 marks)

Exam: 2 hours 30 mins -closed book

 

  1. Genre: Crime Writing

 

Texts studied in class:

• Agatha Christie’s ‘The Murder of Roger Ackroyd’;

• Kate Atkinson’s ‘When Will There Be Good News’

• a selection of poetry (Browning, Crabbe, Wilde)

Exam:

Section A: one compulsory question on an unseen passage (25 marks)

Section B: one essay question on set text (25 marks)

Section C: one essay question exploring an aspect of crime writing through the study of Christie’s and Atkinson’s texts (25 marks)

Exam: 3 hours -open book

 

  1. Coursework: Theory and Independence

 

Two pieces of coursework are required; each essay should be 1,250–1,500 words. Students study and apply a Feminist, Marxist or Eco-critical reading to their chosen texts. 

(20%)